Thursday, April 7, 2011

Heroic Death?

Attila the Hun - known at "the scourge of God" by the Romans- was the ruler of the hunnic empire from ~423-453 (the exact start date is unknown as it also correlates with his brother, Bleda's, death).

Attila was said to eat off of wooden plates while his lieutenants ate from silver, among other luxurious metals of the time. A simple man, Attila conquered a vast amount of Eurasia during his reign.His hoards pilaged, ravanged and destroyed towns, villiages, and cities- such as the city of Naissus- it is said that when the roman ambassadors visisted the city to meet with Attila several years later, they had to camp outside the city because they could not bear the stench of roting corpse within the city- in fact, no one could. His conquests included pilaging cities as prominant as Milan, Padua, and Aquileia (the present day city of Venice, Italy- actually founded as a result of Attila's attack on the city). He was truly an evil man...

And yet...with all his power, pillage, gold, and land...Attila the Hun died of an epistaxis, known more commonly as a noseblead. I guess heroes (or villians...depends on which side you're on- romans or huns) don't always die heroic deaths...

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